CHEMICAL & BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING

People

Faculty

Michael E Mackay

Michael  Mackay
  • Distinguished Professor of Materials Science & Engineering
  • Full Professor

205 DUP
University of Delaware
Newark, Delaware 19716
mem@udel.edu
302-831-302-831-6194
302-831-1048 (fax)


Education
  • Doctorate - 1985 University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign
  • Masters - 1983 University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign
  • Bachelors - 1979 University of Delaware

"Research in Dr. Mackay`s group is centered on two phenomena-dispersion of nanoparticles in polymeric materials and segregation of them from the same polymer when they are in a thin film. As it turns out, a surface introduces extra forces to the thermodynamics controlling miscibility and fine tuning the surface versus bulk phenomena allows assembly to the air interface or to the solid substrate supporting the film; of course, in a thick film, bulk phenomena occur.

Nanoparticle segregation in thin films is useful for energy applications, in particular, in the manufacture of organic-based solar cells. By controlling the segregation, or really self-assembly, solar cells can be manufactured cheaply and eventually on any substrate. However, to realize this type of device manufacture nanoscale characterization and the interaction of nanostructure development and processing conditions are critical. In Dr. Mackay`s group, many different characterization techniques to understand nanostructure-property correlations in thin polymer films used to make solar cells are used.

Dr. Mackay`s group is also interested in how nanoparticles affect the properties of bulk polymers. An initial discovery was that addition of nanoparticles to polymers can produce a viscosity decrease, a result at odds with Einstein`s original prediction that particles suspended in a liquid provides a viscosity increase. Furthermore, nanoparticle miscibility in polymers was found by the group to be very unusual and at odds with contemporary thought. We believe this phenomenon is dominated by the relative size of the nanoparticle and polymer molecule to create this and other unusual effects that have been observed"

XSelected Publications

For a complete listing of publications, please view the Full CV.
  1. Chung, W.J.; Griebel, J.J.; Kim, E.T.; Yoon, H.; Simmonds, A.G.; Ji, H.J.; Dirlam, P.T.; Glass, R.S.; Wie, J.J.; Nguyen, N.A.; Guralnick, B.W.; Park, J.; Somogyi, A.; Theato, P.; Mackay, M.E.; Sung, Y.E.; Char, K. and Pyun, J., "The use of elemental sulfur as an alternative feedstock for polymeric materials", Nature Chemistry 5, 518, (2013)
  2. Yan, C.Q.; Mackay, M.E.; Czymmek, K.; Nagarkar, R.P.; Schneider, J.P. and Pochan, D.J., "Injectable solid peptide hydrogel as a cell carrier: Effects of shear flow on hydrogels and cell payload", Langmuir 28, 6076, (2012)
  3. Keil, J.; Kirby, B.; Majkrzak, C.; Maranville, B. and Mackay M.E., "Nanoparticle concentration profile in polymer-based solar cells", Soft Matter 6, 641, (2010)
  4. Kiel, J.; Mackay, M.E.; Kirby, B.; Maranville, B. and Majkrzak, C., "Phase-sensitive neutron reflectometry measurements applied in the study of photovoltaic films", J. Chem. Phys. 133, 074902, (2010)
  5. Kiel, J.W.; Eberle, A.P.R. and Mackay, M.E., "Nanoparticle agglomeration in polymer-basedsolar cells", Phys Rev. Letters 105, 168701, (2010)
  6. A.Tuteja, P. M. Duxbury and M. E. Mackay, "Polymer chain swelling induced by dispersed nanoparticles", Phys. Rev. Letters 100, (2008)
  7. R. S. Krishnan, M. E. Mackay, P. M. Duxbury, A. Pastor, C. J. Hawker, B. Van Horn, S. Asokan and M.S. Wong, "Self-assembled multilayers of nanocomponents", Nano Letters 7, 484, (2007)
  8. J. Xu, D. A. Bohnsack, M. E. Mackay and K. L. Wooley, "Unusual Mechanical Performance of Amphiphilic Crosslinked Polymer Networks", 129, 506, (2007)
  9. A. Tuteja, M. E. Mackay, S. Narayanan, S. Asokan and M. S. Wong, "Breakdown of the continuum Stokes-Einstein relation for nanoparticle diffusion", 7, 1276, (2007)
  10. 2 E. S. McGarrity, A. L. Frischknecht, L. J. D. Frink and M. E. Mackay, "Surface-induced First Order Transition in Athermal Polymer/Nanoparticle Blends", Phys Rev Letters 99, (2007)

XPatents

XSelected Awards

For a complete listing of awards, please view the Full CV.
  1. College of Engineering Teaching Fellowship
  2. Degree with Distinction (University of Delaware)
  3. Graduate Fellowship (Exxon)
  4. Chemical Engineering Graduate Fellowship
  5. Graduate Fellowship (Exxon)
  6. Graduate Fellowship (Chevron)
  7. College of Engineering Teaching Award (University of Queensland)
  8. Society of Rheology Publication Award
  9. Max Planck Institute, Workshop Lecturer (Colloidal Processing of Ceramics)


Bookmark and Share